Community & Tools

New York Times, David Brooks

"The New Power Structure"

"The New Power Structure"

We have seen an explosion of new social organisms that don’t look like the old ones: Airbnb, Etsy, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, Blockchain.

If power in the Greatest Generation looked like Organization Men running big institutions, and power for the boomers looked like mass movements organized by charismatic leaders like Steve Jobs and Barack Obama, power these days looks like decentralized networks in which everyone is a leader and there’s no dominating idol.

Power structures are in serious flux. The best window I’ve seen into this new world is a book called “New Power,” by Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms.

Continue reading

CNBC, Kathleen Elkins

"Self-made billionaire Richard Branson has a new favorite business book"

"Self-made billionaire Richard Branson has a new favorite business book"

Self-made billionaire Richard Branson has another book to add to his long list of “must-reads”: “New Power,” by Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms.

In it, the authors discuss a shift from “old power,” which they define as being “held by few” and “closed, inaccessible and leader-driven,” to “new power,” which is “made by many” and “open, participatory and peer-driven.”

The power shift is one that Branson, who started his first business half a century ago, has witnessed and one he thinks has the potential to do good.

The book is particularly helpful, says Branson, because the authors explain how to build and successfully channel new power: “It’s a useful lens to use when thinking about how business has changed, how to spread ideas or start a movement, or create change.”

Continue reading

The Guardian, Decca Aitkenhead

"New Power author Jeremy Heimans: 'Like it or not, the old world isn't coming back'"

"New Power author Jeremy Heimans: 'Like it or not, the old world isn't coming back'"

There is nothing out of the ordinary about a book that makes one angry. We have all read ones that provoke us, and the internet is an inexhaustible feast for anyone easily outraged. It is unusual, however, to read a book that makes one mad with oneself.

The co-authors of New Power could not be more likable. Clever, witty and creative, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans are baby-faced wunderkinds of digital activism; the type whose optimistic energy ought to make one feel hopeful for the future. So it is uncomfortable to confess that I hated almost every word, and wished more than anything for them to be wrong. The reason their book made me so cross with myself was that, if they are right, it means my way of thinking is old-fashioned and elitist – the very problem, in fact, they are trying to solve.

Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

Read the full article

Financial Times

"Business Books of the Month: April Edition"

"Business Books of the Month: April Edition"

Self-organising movements, from #BlackLivesMatter and Occupy to #MeToo and #NeverAgain, are hard to analyse. By definition, they tend to start from the grass roots and grow without obvious structure until they either attain a more formal structure or disintegrate.

The authors have first-hand experience of the workings of “new power” — which is informal, collaborative, open and participatory. Jeremy Heimans is co-founder of Purpose, which helps oil the wheels of social movements, and Henry Timms, executive director of the 92nd Street Y, the venerable New York cultural hub, helped launch the #GivingTuesday campaign.

One of their insights is that new power values and old power values are not synonymous with “good” and “bad” values, and most organisations and leaders are likely to blend the two. Isis has used new power tools such as social media to recruit. Barack Obama campaigned with a new power model and values, but adopted the more rigid and formal model of an old power leader. As the authors point out: “In a world of old and new power colliding, competing, and converging, everyone is on the move.”

Continue reading

Dallas Innovates, Heather Noel

"In Our Hyperconnected World, Dallas Leaders Find ‘New Power’ With Public Collaboration"

"In Our Hyperconnected World, Dallas Leaders Find ‘New Power’ With Public Collaboration"

United Way has been working in the social sphere for more than 125 years, but don’t call it “old.”

At least when talking about it in terms of “old power,” as outlined by authors Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, says Jennifer Sampson, president and CEO of the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

Sampson read the 2014 Business Review article and noticed under examples of old power institutions, Timms and Heimans listed United Way.

“That caught my eye and I didn’t like it. I don’t want to lead an old power,” said Sampson, who in 2011 became the first female CEO of the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

Read the full article

Government vs The Robots: New Power

How do ideas spread in today’s world? We talk to Henry Timms, one of the authors of the book New Power about why we need to rethink the way power flows through society. It’s well established that people no longer trust institutions but do institutions trust people? The conversation draws on examples from Tetris to Texas to demonstrate the characteristics of new power and you’ve ever wondered how climate change deniers are out communicating climate change campaigners then this is the episode for you.

Listen to the episode here.

InTension, Mike Romig

"Living in a New Power world requires new competencies"

"Living in a New Power world requires new competencies"

The current legal and administrative infrastructure as well as economic systems in most countries are still very much unsupportive of such independent workers, entrepreneurs or people who take the risk of living and working outside of what Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans refer to as the “Old Power” world of long-term stable jobs and affiliation, of professionalism and career paths, of competition and status.

These tensions between enjoying the life of freedom I want and being able create my own reality every day on the one hand, and the uncertainty, unpredictability and responsibility this brings on the other hand, are increasingly going to be the life of many of those in my generation who see themselves as “makers”, who are unsatisfied with the world as it stands today, and who seek to create a new one by harnessing the collective intelligence and energy of the crowd — or what Jeremy and Henry call “New Power”.

To be able to handle the tensions inherent in living in a world of New Power requires a whole new set of competencies which most of us have never learned at school, in our families nor in society at large.

Continue reading

Reading ‘New Power’ Through Old Power Higher Ed Eyes

I’m old power.  I have old power values.  And I work in an old power model.

This is one of the things that I learned by reading New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World and How to Make It Work for You.

A quick way to situate where you and the institution / organization that you work on the new power compass is to check out the matrix below.  (Stolen from the HBR article in which the book grew out of):

The realization that I’ve spent my life in “Castles” hit me sort of hard.  (My only non higher ed gig was at Britannica).

Last week I spent a few days at ASU’s EdPlus unit. EdPlus is the learning innovation and online education unit of ASU.  It is an institution whose culture most closely embodies new power values.

Read the full article here.

Dallas News, Cheryl Hall

"Social activists tell how to make the hashtag work for — not against — you in 'New Power'"

"Social activists tell how to make the hashtag work for — not against — you in 'New Power'"

There’s real power in those hashtags — just ask Harvey Weinstein and Starbucks.

They’ve learned the hard way that the wrath of social media can be swift and ferocious.

None of this is a surprise to Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms.

Together they’ve written New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World — and How to Make It Work for You, released by Doubleday earlier this month and now the publishing company’s hottest title.

Read the full article

800-CEO-READS

"Business Books to Watch in April"

"Business Books to Watch in April"

The definitive guide to spreading ideas, building movements, and leaping ahead in our chaotic, connected age. Get the book New York Times columnist David Brooks calls “the best window I’ve seen into this new world.”

For most of human history, the rules of power were clear: power was something to be seized and then jealously guarded. This “old power” was out of reach for the vast majority of people. But our ubiquitous connectivity makes possible a different kind of power. “New power” is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It works like a current, not a currency—and it is most forceful when it surges. The battle between old and new power is determining who governs us, how we work, and even how we think and feel.

Continue reading

1A Interview, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms

"The ‘New Power’ Generation: A Manifesto For A More Humane World"

"The ‘New Power’ Generation: A Manifesto For A More Humane World"

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

Heimans and Timms join us to explain how it applies to modern movements, from MeToo to the youth-led call for gun legislation after the shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Watch the show

CEO Magazine, Oliver Featherston

"For your reading list: We review 3 intriguing business books"

"For your reading list: We review 3 intriguing business books"

We live in an increasingly connected, globalised world. Movements like #MeToo or the alt-right, corporations like Facebook or Uber – the explosion of these ideas demonstrate the changing nature of power.

No longer static, power is now chaotic and mutable, and ordinary citizens may find themselves in power one day, and then lose it the next.

Continue reading

Eric Ries, The Lean Startup

"New Power: An Interview with Henry Timms"

"New Power: An Interview with Henry Timms"

Heimans and Timms spent three years talking to practitioners, academics and researchers on the cutting edge of what they call new power, which flows from what they think of as the essential skill of the 21st century: the ability to harness the energy of the connected crowd.

Their research and conversations took place all around the world and included everyone from the heads of intelligence agencies in Washington to frontline health workers in the Netherlands. They write about the battle and balance between old power to new power, and show how they’re fueling the defining transformation of our times. But like all fast-moving trends, sometimes it’s hard to see it clearly when we’re right in the middle of it, which makes New Power just that much more important. It’s a guide to spreading ideas, launching movements, raising money and much more.

Continue reading

Fortune Commentary, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans

"#DeleteFacebook Is Just the Beginning. Here’s the Movement We Could See Next"

"#DeleteFacebook Is Just the Beginning. Here’s the Movement We Could See Next"

A few years ago, you may remember seeing Facebook (FB, +0.91%) posts like this dotting your newsfeed.

The posts were based on an urban myth. The Rome Statute in fact covers crimes against humanity, not Facebook’s relationship with its users. But the popularity of such posts remind us that the #DeleteFacebook movement we have seen in recent days has much deeper roots.

Continue reading to see more of the Fortune adaption from Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans book New Power.

Read the article

Beth Kanter, Master Trainer, Speaker, and Author

"The Nonprofit Book We’ve Been Waiting Four Years To Read Is Finally Here"

"The Nonprofit Book We’ve Been Waiting Four Years To Read Is Finally Here"

New power is not just a passing trend, it matters for civil society.

Connectivity and platforms like Facebook can bring us closer together and inspire amazing work or they can be weaponized to drive us further apart as we’ve been witnessing over the past 18 months.

Read the article

Exposure Health — A New Power Model

May 4th, 2018 — Asheville, NC — Not being a climatologist, meteorologist, or environmental health specialist is a challenge when you are trying to raise awareness of the exposure impacts of the weather and the environment on health. However, that’s because the model for the distribution of weather and environmental knowledge and information is based on old power. We have a system that distributes weather and environmental exposure information to the masses when in fact individuals are sensitive to these exposures uniquely.

Our physician-centered healthcare system runs on old power. In New Power, by Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms, they explain;

“Physicians have become accustomed to being keepers of medical knowledge, distanced from their patients by a hyphenated lexicon and inscrutable prescriptions.”

In the case of environmental factors, if physicians did not understand the impacts of outdoor weather or environmental exposures on an asthma patient, or they felt the correlation was insufficiently validated, it was neglected. Asthma educators arose, in part, because physicians were not sufficiently educating patients about the triggers that could cause negative health outcomes. This is in part because we lacked the infrastructure that is emerging today; wearable sensors, big data, and machine learning that could inform physicians of the exposure impacts on their patient.

Read the full article

Mic, Anthony Smith

"Jeremy Heimans: To truly defeat the NRA, we have to learn from them"

"Jeremy Heimans: To truly defeat the NRA, we have to learn from them"

Jeremy Heimans believes he’s figured out the secret to the National Rifle Association’s power — and it isn’t necessarily what you think.

“The NRA has systematically sought to project this image of its own might, even though it’s actually one of the less effective spenders in U.S. elections in terms of outcomes,” Heimans, the CEO and co-founder of Purpose, told Mic. “It often takes credit for races that either the pro-gun supporting candidate was going to win anyway, or where it invested less than $100 in the outcome of the race.”

“We all want to be more powerful, and we all want to make change and impact in the world,” Heimans said. “Today we have a choice about what kind of power we choose to exercise: old power and new power.”

Listen to the show

Ellen McGirt, Fortune

"raceAhead: Finding New Power At Work"

"raceAhead: Finding New Power At Work"

If the world seems increasingly wild and unfamiliar, you’re not alone. Hashtags, hate speech, and social movements ignite without warning, companies (like Uber) and candidates (like Obama and Trump) ascend from nowhere, and every day we are confronted with more evidence that technology is enabling both the best and worst human impulses…

Rather than parrot the now familiar tech-topia talking points of “democratization” and prosperity through connectivity, the authors offer both context and practical advice that one can use to succeed in a tech-enabled world that’s profoundly imperfect but ever-present.

Read the article

The National, former UK ambassador Tom Fletcher

"There are fewer wars when you take power away from men in big castles"

"There are fewer wars when you take power away from men in big castles"

Those who have power want to be told they have it and how to keep it. Those that don’t have power want someone to envy. As a result, the audience for books on power is seemingly endless.

So I was initially cautious about another one released this week – but New Power by Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms turns out to be a nifty guide to the 21st century that is genuinely new. Instead of one more catchy way of describing how the world works, they have written a manifesto for organising that world with more humanity and purpose.

Ultimately you’ll either hate it or wish you had written it, depending on whether you believe in old or new power.

But what does that actually mean?

Read the full article

Philanthropy’s “New Power” Challenges

I don’t recall ever reading a nonfiction book as quickly as I’ve just read Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms’s new book, New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World — and How to Make It Work for You. It helps that Phil Buchanan, CEP’s president, reviewed the book recently in The Chronicle of Philanthropy and has recommended it highly to my colleagues and me. Timms also spoke on this topic at CEP’s 2015 conference in San Francisco, back when some of the main ideas in the book were outlined in this article in the Harvard Business Review.

In Heimans and Timms’s telling, “new power” dynamics are providing new methods of participation and agency for people, organizations, and causes that we are increasingly seeing around us. While “old power” values are often formal and prize expertise, confidentiality, professionalism, and pedigree, new power values prize decentralized decision-making, organic multiplication, the wisdom of crowds, radical transparency, and a bootstrap mentality.

Read the full article here.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Phil Buchanan, President

"Putting ‘New Power’ to Work in Philanthropy"

"Putting ‘New Power’ to Work in Philanthropy"

A rich and deeply researched new book expertly delineates the fundamental shift in how people get things done in a hyperconnected world, offering lessons every foundation and nonprofit leader should heed.

Read the article

Slate, Daily Feed

"Gist: James Comey's Ego Trip"

"Gist: James Comey's Ego Trip"

On Monday’s Gist, we’re counting Pulitzers and powering up.

Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms sort power into two categories: old and new. Old power is like Congress: top-down, official. New power is like Facebook: decentralized, crowd-sourced. What is the best way to meld both kinds of influence to improve our lives? Heimans and Timms have the beginnings of an answer. They’re the authors of New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World – and How to Make It Work for You.

In the Spiel, James Comey does seem ego-driven. That’s not always a bad thing.

Listen to the show

New Power – A Blessing or A Curse?

On its surface, New Power looks like a breathless book by two social media experts about how decentralized power is changing the world for the better. Occupy, MeToo, Black Lives Matter, the Ice Bucket Challenge, and even Oreo Cookies have shown, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms say, that New Power is people’s power, decentralized power, peer-generated power that can be channeled but not managed from on high. “It’s only a movement if it moves without you,” they say.

Reading the book, however, I found myself growing more pessimistic, conservative, elitist, and crotchety. After all, right-wing populist movements like the Leave campaign in Britain, the Tea Party and MAGA movements in the U.S., and many others utilize “New Power” too, often more effectively than their progressive or centrist opponents. The more I read of New Power, the more old and embittered I felt.

So I decided to ask them about that. Both are experts:  Timms launched the Giving Tuesday campaign, which is now part of our holiday season calendar, and Heimans co-founded the online activism platform Avaaz andPurpose.org, which has built activist campaigns for Google, the ACLU, and the LGBT group All Out, among others. Their TED talk on “new power” has gotten over 1.25 million views and CNN called “new power” one of the “top ten ideas to change the world in 2015.”

Lucky for me, both are also in my own New York, Jewish, and (in Heimans’ case) gay orbits, so I decided to treat this interview like getting a round of drinks with these guys, playing devil’s advocate, and leaving the jokes in the final transcript. Here’s what went down.

Read the full article here.

Jay Geneske, A Hundred Years

“Sparking a Movement Inside and Outside Your Organization”

“Sparking a Movement Inside and Outside Your Organization”

In today’s hyper-connected, globalized world, where new social-political reckonings catch fire overnight, the stakes have never been greater for brands to mobilize their audiences—inside and outside their four walls—to take a stand together.

Continue reading

Quiet Revolution Interview, Jeremy Heimans + Henry Timms

"New Power"

"New Power"

Quiet Revolution is excited to spread the word about Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans’ new book New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World – And How to Make it Work for You The authors sat down to answer these questions for Quiet Revolution

Read the interview

Huffpost, Vinay Nair

"A World Without Social Media: Would That Be A Force For Good?"

"A World Without Social Media: Would That Be A Force For Good?"

When Mark Zuckerberg and his friends set up Facebook in their Harvard dormitory rooms in 2004, little did they anticipate growing a social network bigger than any country on the planet, with more than 2.1 billion monthly active users. What was surely even further from their minds, was that it would also lead to Zuckerberg being summoned to the U.S. Congress 14 years on, to face questioning over Cambridge Analytica harvesting data from up to 87 million Facebook users…

Power is shifting back into the hands of the people. There has been a revival in grassroots civic engagement, with social media giving both a voice to those silenced, and a means to galvanise. Social media is now one of the main tools for raising awareness on important issues and pushing for reform, a topic also discussed in the new book, New Power by Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans.

Continue reading

Hidden Forces, Podcast

"New Power in the 21st Century. What are the Forces Reshaping Politics, Business and Society?"

"New Power in the 21st Century. What are the Forces Reshaping Politics, Business and Society?"

In this week’s episode of Hidden Forces, Demetri speaks with Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms, the authors of the book “New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World and How to Make It Work for You.”

So, if we accept that the world is changing and that the dynamics of power are changing with it, what then? How is this battle between old and new power determining who governs us, how we work, and even how we think and feel? How can understanding new power dynamics help us reshape the world around us in a positive way? What can the distribution of power in the 21st century tell us about how the future is going to unfold? Is our ability to mobilize the mass of humanity in previously unimaginable ways a net positive development for the aims of egalitarianism and progress?

Listen to the show

AHS Design Lab, M. van Dijk, L. Lutes

"New Power: A story of broad engagement and change in a large healthcare organization"

"New Power: A story of broad engagement and change in a large healthcare organization"

We had a problem.

One of our organizational key strategies was having trouble getting traction. After two years of broad public consultation and the anointing of a steering committee there was still very little action beyond engagement and planning.

Although the Patient First strategy is one of four pillar strategies within Alberta Health Services (AHS), and even though it was central to health services becoming more patient and family centred, many staff and leaders expressed confusion about what Patient First was, and what it meant. Direction and planning was done by a select few people across the organization.

It was clear something had to happen. Success depended on broad engagement from staff and patients to help make services better.

Read the article

Advance, Australia

"Jeremy Heimas: The Up-start"

"Jeremy Heimas: The Up-start"

Meet Jeremy Heimans, co-founder and CEO of Purpose, 2012 Advance Award winner and co-author of the book New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World- and How to Make It Work for You.

Jeremy’s work has literally mobilised millions of citizens and consumers to help solve major global problems. He is the true definition of a global Australian achieving incredible things!

The release of his new book New Power is the talk of the town. It lays out the most important skill of the 21st Century: the ability to harness the energy of the connected crowd (for better and worse).

Continue reading

Alice Korngold, Korngold Consulting

“Boards of Directors: Will Old Power Give Way to New Power?”

“Boards of Directors: Will Old Power Give Way to New Power?”

Historically, boards of directors have been bastions of old power. A person qualified for the board by being a member of an exclusive class. Old power, as defined by Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms in their new book, New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World and How to Make it Work for You, “works like currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven.”

Using Heimans and Timms definition, boards of directors have been quintessential old power. It is becoming evident, however, that these homogenous boards comprised of the anointed actually stunt corporate growth.

Continue reading

Virgin Unite

"A new way to be powerful in a world that feels out of control"

"A new way to be powerful in a world that feels out of control"

From the out-of-nowhere victory of Donald Trump, to the insurgency of movements like #MeToo, to the growing power of platforms like Facebook to tweak our daily thoughts, feelings and habits.

Of course technology is changing, but we are also changing. To really understand what’s happening around us, we need to reckon not with changes in technology, but shifts in power.

Most of us grew up in a world built on old power. We had relatively little agency. Institutions like schools or the factory floor set narrow terms of engagement. We complied. We consumed. We paid our dues and played our part. It was a world built largely on “download”.

But in the early 21st century our ubiquitous connectivity has handed us what we can think of the new “means of participation”.

Read the full article

Medium, Tirrania Suhood

"Let's Make New Power a Force for Good"

"Let's Make New Power a Force for Good"

I’ve been loving reading “New Power”, launched just last week.

For me New Power is more than a book. While it gives plenty of examples of movements, I am experiencing New Power itself to also be a movement.

I read the forerunner article on New Power some time ago and I kept using the hashtag #newpower in my tweets. Yes, there was something about that article that spoke to me and I wanted the world to know about the ideas!

I was surprised and delighted when authors Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans in recent times reached out to me (and lots of others) to help with the launch of the book.

As I read New Power it makes more and more sense why they contacted me. I’ve been a early adopter. They made a reasonable assumption that I would get on board now. Engaging people like me is part of their strategy for movement building. People like me will take hold of the idea, add additional meaning to it and spread it to further progress consciousness of power in our societies.

Continue reading

Civic Hall, Micah Sifry

"New Power and the Dynamics of Digital Change"

"New Power and the Dynamics of Digital Change"

If you are looking for a fresh and comprehensive analysis of how the Digital Age is transforming the civic arena, get yourself a copy of New Power, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms’ new book, which is being released today.

What I found most valuable about New Power was the effort Heimans and Timms made to flesh out the backstory to many of the new power moments they use to enliven their larger argument. For example, they lucidly explain the origins and early organizing efforts of the group Invisible Children before they take us through its explosive flameout with the Kony 2012 video. I’ve long used that case as an example of how hard it is to convert momentary global fame into ongoing on-the-ground action in our age of hyper-distracting media, but in Heimans and Timms’ hands Invisible Children is first and foremost a great model for how to build what they call a “new power community.” That’s a place where three key factors are aligned: a platform owner who stewards the community’s brand and purpose, an engaged group of “super-participants” who do a lot of the heavy-lifting and gain meaning from being able to help shape the community, and a larger base of regular participants who come along for the ride.

Read the article

The Connectivist, Prof. Jaap van Till

"Important new book : New Power"

"Important new book : New Power"

At last there is “New Power”, a book that describes how to bottom-up WEAVE Online Communities into swarms of Positive Participating People.

Cases are analysed in which people interconnect, participate, cooperate and contribute meaning that can be synthesised, so it creates value by synergy to all participants.

This can scale up into a type of society I call  “The #Synthecracy”.

Its Message is in the Connections with Others.

Continue reading

Entrepreneur, Hayden Field

"3 Ways to Harness the 'New Power' That Let Airbnb, Kickstarter and Other Companies Climb to the Top"

"3 Ways to Harness the 'New Power' That Let Airbnb, Kickstarter and Other Companies Climb to the Top"

Dictionaries pin down the first known use of the word “power” to between the years 1250 and 1300 — the same century that brought us classics including “poison,” “pitchfork” and “patience.”

Although the literary definition of power hasn’t changed, recent years have seen a shift in its cultural meaning.

There’s a reason why the likes of Airbnb have overtaken Hilton in revenue, argue Timms and Heimans. Simple investing apps with a focus on accessibility continue to grow in popularity, even as large investment management companies seem to rest on their laurels.

Read the full article

Fox Business Network, “Maria Bartiromo’s Wall Street”

“New Power” authors Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms discuss how people can obtain power in the 21st century.

Watch the show

TYT Network

"TYT Interviews – Jeremy Heimans & Henry Timms"

"TYT Interviews – Jeremy Heimans & Henry Timms"

Cenk interviews  authors of “New Power” Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms.

Listen to the show

Civicist, MICAH L. SIFRY

"Your Data"

"Your Data"

Life in Facebookistan: Speaking to Vox’s Ezra Klein a few days ago, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pointed to the company’s detection and blocking of malicious messages flowing through Messenger from inside Myanmar, inciting Muslims and Buddhists to arm themselves and go fight each other, as an example of how it is taking seriously its role in that country’s civil strife.

This is civic tech: In other news, New York Times’ columnist David Brooks read Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms’ new book New Power and sees in it evidence that “people are ingenious” and they are figuring out how to “redeem the broader social fabric” building on local ties of trust.

Read the full article

Fortune, CEO Daily

"World's Greatest Leaders"

"World's Greatest Leaders"

Fortune’s World’s Greatest Leaders list is out this morning, and at the top of it are a bunch of kids—the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and elsewhere, who have challenged the powerful NRA with surprising effectiveness. That says something important about the nature of modern leadership. We live at a time when the captains of business and government are being taken on by surging currents of social media-fed sentiment. If you have any doubts about that, ask Harvey Weinstein —who once ruled Hollywood but was toppled last year by the #MeToo movement, which is No. 3 on the Fortune list.

Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms have captured this change in their just-published book, New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World–and How to Make it Work For You. They argue that “old power”–top down, jealously guarded, held by the few–is giving way to “new power”–bottom-up, participatory, peer-driven. The future belongs to “those best able to channel the participatory energy of those around them–for the good, for the bad, and for the trivial.” Expect to hear more of this in the future.

Continue reading

Next in Nonprofits Podcast with Henry Timms

Henry Timms is the CEO of the 92nd Street Y, which “promotes individual and family development and participation in civic life within the context of Jewish values and American pluralism.” Henry founded #GivingTuesday in 2012, a growing global day of giving, and has continued to evolve the ideas and values of #GivingTuesday through a new book co-authored with Jeremy Heimans, New Power. The book – and much of the values behind #GivingTuesday – emphasize a new paradigm of decentralized, shared power, and how movement building can supplant old ideas of centralized control.

Henry talks about the intentional “open sourcing” of #GivingTuesday, how the New Power values add to donor/supporter agency – changing a perhaps more passive role to a more active one. Charities and movements which show a willingness to evolve business models based on a shared (and therefore improved) power dynamic have new opportunities with new tools. Take the New Power Quiz and share your thoughts in your favorite New Power space (Twitter, Facebook, or anywhere else).

Listen to the episode here.

How ‘new power’ is driving journalism in the digital age

A new book on so-called “new power” has attracted endorsements from a glittering array of public figures, ranging from entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson, comedian Russell Brand and primatologist Jane Goodall to former Australian High Court judge Michael Kirby.

According to the book’s authors, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms, the differences between “old power” of the 20th century and “new power” of the 21st century are the approaches to governance, competition, sharing of information, expertise, and loyalty and affiliation.

In the new power paradigm, collaboration and crowd sharing are valued. Transparency and a do-it-yourself culture are favoured over secrecy and relying on experts. Affiliation to groups is not reliant on long-term loyalty; rather, short-term affiliations can lead to greater public participation. Heimans and Timms argue that new power values have moved away from formal governance structures to informal (or networked) governance, allowing individuals to opt-in.

Read the full article here.

How to Build a Movement

Sharing ideas from their new book, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms share the 5 steps to build a movement today.

Sharing ideas from their new book, Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms share the 5 steps to build a movement today.

How Ideas Spread

There are three design principles key to making an idea spread in a new power world. Ideas that take off are actionable, connected, extensible (ACE).

There are three design principles key to making an idea spread in a new power world. Ideas that take off are actionable, connected, extensible (ACE).

The Overview

How do we make sense of a world where the unexpected keeps happening?

Whoever mobilizes is going to win, and if you end up understanding new power, you can end up on top. Welcome to the new power world.

How do we make sense of a world where the unexpected keeps happening?

How do we make sense of a world where the unexpected keeps happening?

Whoever mobilizes is going to win, and if you end up understanding new power, you can end up on top. Welcome to the new power world.

New Power Compass

A way to understand the interplay between old or new power models and old or new power values.

The horizontal axis tracks the values of an organization: whether it exhibits new or old power values. The vertical looks at its model: whether it is a new power model designed and structured to encourage mass participation and peer coordination or an old power model that asks us to do little more than comply or consume.

A way to understand the interplay between old or new power models and old or new power values.

The horizontal axis tracks the values of an organization: whether it exhibits new or old power values. The vertical looks at its model: whether it is a new power model designed and structured to encourage mass participation and peer coordination or an old power model that asks us to do little more than comply or consume.

Old vs. New Power

There are two big forces at play in our world today: old and new power. New power is made by many, it is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It operates like a current and, like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is to channel it.

There are two big forces at play in our world today: old and new power. New power is made by many, it is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It operates like a current and, like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is to channel it.

Share how you've seen and used new power in your life.

tweet now Post on Facebook
Spread the idea

The future will go to those who know how to mobilize around New Power, and right now it’s up for grabs. Send the book to the people, the organizations, the businesses you want to win.

Bulk Order
See what people are saying about New Power. Add your opinion

Critics and everyday readers are calling New Power the ‘must read of the year.’ Add in your own review of the book.

Read the reviews
Business, Politics, Activism, and Pop Culture

New Power shines fresh light on the largest phenomena of our day: from #BlackLivesMatter to Airbnb to the election of President Trump, these ideas unpack the new power forces that make them huge.

Learn More